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CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:15am EDT
education system to free up the knowledge to make it look attractive for minorities to have the desire to want to learn the way out to be just as successful as those that they look up to? >> writing the book one of the things that has stuck with me is yon black and brown men, young boys are not accepting. culturally part of it is societal but the dinosaur had the ice age. we have education and technology. they did not make the adjustment it is not here. if the black brown mail this not make the adjustment they will not be here. we have to make it safe for our children to be smart, respectful, individua ls because what i was a boy i wanted to be excepted so bad i or myself to me i try. i will never let that happen again. to say if i cannot change the people around me you have to be afraid to stand by yourself that is the clearest it will ever be. there is a tendency to be accepted so bad people have all kinds of estimations but a man would do anything to take care of the family. not that i would not do that. and a woman sought a man who do anything you could do it every wanted the you will
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 10:00am EDT
education is our most pressing political, social and moral problem. everybody knows it, and positions are entrenched, and there's a lot of hot rhetoric on all sides. somehow we've gotten to a point where frustration has built to such a fever pitch, that we've turned on teachers as the villains and started shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer after a good story to tell, i went looking in the pressure cooker of a public high school working against the clock to raise test scores. i wanted to take a look at what we're throwing away in this big national purge. instead, i found a dynamic principle leading a -- principal, leading a group of passionate, dedicated teachers at a school with a proud tradition to rally the community around. i found a scramble to help a surprisingly savvy group of kids who have been largely abandoned by the system. um, as most of you probably know, the book traces the pivotal 2009-2010 school year at reagan high, and we've been -- weaved in a lot of its history. not all, but a lot. at that point, just to kind of set the stage, the school was rat
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 11:45am EDT
situation we were in, we felt safe and comfortable there, and my fathermented us to have an education, and he knew that education was the key to a better life, but i think he thought all of us would just come right back home and try to work from there, but i grew up with lots of family and community support. i grew up, went to a segregated school. when they -- when brown versus board of education passed, georgia's answer was to just throw up these schools to supposedly give us equal, separate, but equal facilities so i only -- i only attended segregated schools, but in those schools, we had people who cared. we had teachers who cared, but they all -- one thing they drilled into us in the church, in our homes, and in the schools was that they expected us to do good. they expected us to go and do good and reach back and help others. [applause] >> it's interesting you say that because in the country right now, day three of the huge teacher strike in chicago so there's a battle right now for the soul of education, public education. >> yes. >> your daddy was killed by a white fellow. >> ye
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 7:00pm EDT
william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking and national review among other journals. he's a senior fellow at the claire monththe mission to e ree the principles of the american found ming is the intellectual muscle of the i guess -- mission pings. he teaches in the key fellow programs. the fellows program and the lincoln fellows program. most important he's the editor of the clermont review books. a public cage of the
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 4:15pm EDT
achievement who like their ancestors, value family, education, activism. paul jennings had a granddaughter, his namesake named pauline. she was the daughter of a slave. she married the son of a slave and yet he got an m.d. from howard university with a practicing physician in georgetown where they own a home which is a pretty remarkable opportunity given only one generation out of slavery. a very remarkable achievement. their son was an m.d. as well and he is one of my favorite jennings descendants. i like to think that he inherited his ancestor's genes for race activism. as an african-american doctor, he could not go to just any medical school. the about practice in just any hospital. black doctors were not even allowed to join the a am a. he was very active in agitating against these restrictions but he didn't limit his activism to greater opportunities for members of his profession. he spearheaded a petition drive to keep a recreational area in georgetown from becoming segregated and he published bold editorials on race in the washington post and other newspapers. that is
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 10:15am EDT
81. from 81-82 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendments and other developments. who is this we? when did folks like y
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
lifted out of his family and sent to get an education of a sort that no one else in his family got. he had a brother that became a doctor. he didn't have anybody else that went as far as he did in terms of his education. and then going out in to the world in a way that he did, he was lifted up to become the very important figure and he traveled around the world, he took two extended trips to europe and the middle east. and these were very influential for him. he saw the importance or he und the importance of the american republican system in a they he might not had he not traveled and so on. but there are many questions particularly, i think, about his transition to becoming such an adamant emancipationist that i think are still mysterious. i think we can explain some of the support for the union based on having his travel mored and having gone outside the union and having the education that other members didn't have and having had the experience he had. where that antislavely kernel started. that can be traced back to his teens, actually, i cite a speech that he gave in -- when he
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 3:00pm EDT
/localcontent. >> next on booktv education activists jonathan kozol talks about inner-city children he followed since the age of 6 to 18-year-old. he examines the economic and educational obstacles each child has face as they progress through their school system. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thanks, tom and thanks as always to my absolutely favorite bookstore in america, politics and prose. i love that books for. [applause] and thanks to each and every one of you for being here. i am particularly glad to the with so many friends tonight. i don't mean with some double meaning, i just mean friends old and new. some of my oldest friends in the audience. it means a great deal to me because to -- tomorrow is my birthday. i will be all alone on an airplane going through six hours to some place i haven't checked the schedule yet, i think it is something like portland, ore. or san diego. united airlines is not going to give me any presents. are there any teachers with us tonight? how many? oh, great. i am glad. [applause] >> i always feel safer in a room with teacher
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 7:00pm EDT
world. he would don know it but public education is our most pressing public social moral compass. positions are entrenched and there is rhetoric on all sides. somehow we are at a point* frustration is that such us the rear that teachers are the villains and they're shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer i went looking in the pressure cooker of schools to raise test scores against the clock and what we're throwing away. instead i a mad passionate dedicated teachers that the community rallied around i found a group of kids that were largely abandoned by the system. the book traces said 20092010 school year at rated high. at that point* the school was rated academically unacceptable four years running from the state agency. this has practical real-world effects. letters% home saying you don't have to send your kids here. you can send them across the highway. that left the cast some that did not have the resources to get out that were abandoned but have to much loyalty because their big brothers and sisters went to reagan high. at the moment where i started to do res
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 5:00pm EDT
contractors and a number of rounds ranging from private prisons, education to more recently military and security issues has been put outward with much rhetoric, but not a lot of evidence in terms of cost effect it has, for example. my question is simply, how much reflects a blind faith in the precepts of the marketplace and adam smith and how much is attached to corporations that will benefit them in the future? i've written a book on the subject with respect to military contractors with little purple evidence. >> i see the correlation is inverted. it is more expensive and you get less out of it. we have seen how well halliburton dead when they took over the logistics of the army. the army cannot feed itself anymore, which is kind of ridiculous. look at other scandals in iraq can you see these across the board. national security badges is what i did and at some point it struck me as overwhelming that these things were not working as the vonage had claimed they would work. and there are some things that not only because of cost effect of mass i don't want some contract to looking at sens
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 12:00pm EDT
story. that is who she was writing for. she was writing to educate young people. educate them on the politics and social situations of the time. before the publication of "uncle tom's cabin", they were living off of calvin's salary, which was not very much. it was really after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin" and she became a famous author. the most famous author in america, if not the world. this novel brought her great fame and with it came -- some prosperity, but it would've been more if she would've negotiated a contract. she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." before that, she had mostly written sketches for magazines and things like that. but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote income generating novels. she was a housewife who didn't have much of an income. but after "uncle tom's cabin" she became prosperous. she wrote a testament after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." this is where she lived after what the novel that for her personally. the houses in the process of renovation and being acceptab
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 8:00pm EDT
workplace. they make different choices starting in education. you see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping ou
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:15pm EDT
card. this is to help children, you are against children, this is to help education. so it's not enough to say that free markets work. people feel that they are somehow immoral, it is a somehow semi- corrupt bargain, it will wither away and die. we are trying to say no, free markets don't deliver goods, they deliver goods precisely because it is based on morality and moral optimism of the future. you don't make an investment if you think there's not a future. you don't take a risk the risk if you have an environment of pessimism. you take a risk and you think, i may lose everything, but it just may work, so i will try it. that is facing the future. that is why give that kind of optimism and free markets. >> host: in your book "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't", there is a list of taxes, accounts receivable tax, cigarette tax, corporate income tax from a dog license tax, fishing license tax, irs penalties tax, luxury taxes, marriage license taxes, real estate taxes, i am editing as i go. etc. and etc. why did you include this list of different
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 7:45pm EDT
students and lt type things, if you go into the educational context and you are talking about mobile on a smart phone and a lot of this access to the broadband through mobile devices in minority communities in particular, i don't view that as an acceptable substitute for a desktop. >> i thought i would talk about why this story intrigues me so much, little bit about the reporting process. i think that is what intrigues me. i will in the first of all, i am sadly not be fully cross graduate. we were just having a lunch and it was the same day that there was a front-page story in "the new york times." going way back, he started to talk about classmates, the other black classmates and father brooks, and i was intrigued. i was intrigued because parents thomas was one of those classmates and i have not read much about the interaction between justice thomas and father brooks. so that just got me intrigued as a business journalist. it was not a classic business story. but i'm always interested in leadership and mentoring. took quite a while to get justice thomas to speak with me, in part because
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 1:30pm EDT
but they're mostly the french educated lower rank officers and they have a particular perspective. the most detailed documents were the accounts of white french officers and these accounts they wrote shortly after the campaign a couple of months or year or two after the campaign and they rode them with a very different purpose. they rode them to highlight certain soldiers who should get military medals and they also read them because the french government and the army wanted to understand what had gone wrong in 1940, why did we use this campaign so disastrously so it wasn't about human rights or not document in the massacres, but in the context of trying to explain the defeat, the officers very often gave a lot of detail on what had actually happened in the combat right after these people were taken prisoner so those are the most important sources. the soldiers in the diaries admit that they did kill africans. very few of them, but what you can see in the german source mostly the stereotypes about men eating african soldiers that mirror almost 1-1 in the proceeding days. one of the thi
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 2:15pm EDT
. he said that. i quote him. you know, the problem is, you can't point to anything. i begin to educate him and others about the works progress administration. in 1933 when the works progress administration was put into place by fdr it began to pay for things. it did it in a very unusual way. we will pay for 45% of anything you want to build right now. right now. state and local government got together and came up a long list of building projects that were genuinely shovel ready or which they would make sure we're ready . i . people often in my speeches. my first job of high-school. still open today. it was built with dollars and local dollars. i was talking about this recently was one of my law partner, tim cook. joseph timothy cut is from the jersey. the high-school was constructed in 1936 after -- excuse me, 1935 after a process of 14 months using wpa money. when that money came on line, the city fathers of ramsey, new jersey get together and said, let's build a school. they found the land to raise the money. and was open in 14 months. its stance to this day with a wpa marker on
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 2:00pm EDT
affected by home foreclosures. those children the scars, if you like him in the educational personal development for years to come. every time i hear some conservative politician explained why we haven't got the resources to do something about unemployment. another one of these economic downturns of capitalism. i scratch my head because even the most conservative calculation would indicate the cost of not doing something are larger and not to have been undertaken long ago, just as in this case, not to pursue far pushy foreignness, but just as in this case the most stunning thing if you are a normal thinking person, would be to ask yourself, let's see, the last time we had a crisis like this, the last time capitalism's instability took this terrible turn in the 1930s, something very different happened and is happening now. major steps were taken by democratic presidents come and middle of the road are, but suddenly everything changed and he wasn't a big middle of the voter. he suddenly became something else and did a lot of things for the mass of people. none of those are being done n
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 11:00am EDT
him. a lot of people in the age group don't have the education or the desire to spend all their time watching cnn or reading any of the multiple newspapers that there are to get information about the election. so what they get their information from is the mudslinging commercials that are out now by super packs and even the politicians like obama last night who said this isn't a mudslinging campaign, even though we can't change the super subs are right now, how do we change from mudslinging to actual information about the politicians will do if they are elected versus just killing other people's campaigns. >> you know it's funny -- [applause] your reform is hard because one way we tried to stop that, the nastiness was by requiring candidates to appear themselves and say i am alex and i approve this message. so now they go on and approve the message that is mudslinging. so you know, that doesn't help. you know, first of all i'm sorry that young people don't want to read more sources and get our information, but a friend of mine named steve who taught at m.i.t. now teaches at harv
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:00pm EDT
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than gir
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 1:00am EDT
make different choices in education. you see young minute majoring in matt and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have a counsel on women and girl
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 10:00pm EDT
granted in the united states, going to school, getting an education, despite no other virtue then we were born here. nobody deserves to be an american. nobody held a contest and said you were okay, you deserve it, you get to be an american. by the grace of god, we are americans. but this little guy was born into one of the worst environments possible, into a country where you will probably starve to death and get cholera and a bunch of other diseases, probably. if not, you might get maimed. so you might have this. okay, i went to bed hungry a few times because i was born to a teenage mother. okay, my life was pretty bad. let me tell you something. nobody cared -- nobody here has had a really bad. this guy has it bad. now he is laying their dying because his right foot is blowing off, his other foot is partially blown off. he had gangrene and he is dying a slow and miserable death. of course, being an american, what we want to do? we want to help the kid. but do i really want to help the kid -- i'm running a safe house. i am in the middle of baghdad territory, i am risking the lives o
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 12:45pm EDT
policy? what is your educational policy? we don't have answers. the only thing is polarization is reducing political discourse into something that is simplistic to. not only the arab world is falling into that trap but we in the west read this situation to these lengths and egypt is in danger. too many men are wearing head scarves now. the symbol is dynamic and you can laugh but i am sorry to tell you the media coverage is too often the case that we are reducing the reality of a country on symbols. how many women and how many men. what is your position on sharia, if you use the term is over. that is the reality of the simplistic discussion we have. but once again what i am saying to the muslim countries in the arab world you cannot blame the west to reduce the political discourse. this is what is happening in the muslim countries themselves. this is the problem. by going beyond us, polarization is there and we have to move beyond us and we have to face -- this is the second part of the book. what i am trying to tackle, way forward. the critical questions that we have. we have five
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 12:15am EDT
minimum retirement age not to 65 social security h.b. 260 the michigan education association used their political clout to kill the bill. if costs were going to be cut by one of those cuts to go elsewhere. they wanted taxes to go up. that is what it's been happening in wisconsin. in wisconsin school districts districts and municipality simply didn't have the power to roll back some of those union benefits so they only solution to keep a service is going was higher taxes. unions were fine with that it wasn't until scott walker reforms which they protested vehemently and the school districts and municipality's gave the ability to get control of their budgets to bring cost and that is when we saw property taxes fall. government exists to serve the people. protecting the public in giving children get education not be good for cutting into it to families take him pay. the common good has to take tired or over the interest of any narrow group. government unions make this impossible. think about what collective pardoning powers do. means the governments, the people rather their elected r
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 3:30pm EDT
issue of the 21st century are that, race and poverty, and, of course, education is, indeed, governor romney said it the other day, i had to look at the notes to see i had it right, and the criminal justice system because in addition to the discrimination that violates the law, job discrimination, discrimination in housing and housing finance and so on, we have what we all know in terms of the structural, institutional discrimination of how our schools ordinary reason and opee systemmings and michelle alexander and the new jim crow, published by the new press, has made so clear how our criminal justice system operates. now, that's the basic set of things that we talk about in the book. i also talk, and i won't go into it in great length here, but about poverty in relation to place. our inner cities, app -- appalachia, colonial south texas, all of that because that's where we have the persistent poverty where we have the intergenerational poverty, and it -- i found it very interesting. i was down in north carolina the last three days in the blue place in north carolina. you have to be
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 11:00am EDT
is transforming america's approach to energy, education, health care, transportation and more. it is one of the most important and least understood pieces of legislation in modern american history. the short term recovery part as well as the long term investment part. it is also the purist distillation of what obama meant by change. it is a major down payment on all of his biggest campaign promises. the story of the stimulus not only fun and gripping story but it is a microcosm of the obama era. the best way to understand the president, his policies, his approach to politics, his achievements and his troubled marketing this achievement in a city that has gone bonkers. also the best way to understand his enemies. this book documents the republican plot to destroy obama before he even took office. you always heard about it and imagine it must be there but i got these guys to tell me about it. these secret meetings where eric cantor and mitch mcconnell plan their paths to power. before i open this up to what you want to talk about i want to talk about the stimulus because it is a new ne
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 9:00am EDT
addresses problems with education and medical care. mitch mcconnell, leader of the senate republican party, has told us repeatedly that his primary priority was defeating barack obama in 2012. it is readily understandable why he does not wish to emulate senator kennedy and thus enable obama's reelection. one could easily say newt gingrich made a mighty contribution to reelecting bill clinton. in 1996 by giving him a welfare bill that he was surprised to discover that clinton would sign. it may be the weakness of the candidacy would have doomed to regardless but in many ways the election was over. that kennedy embrace so-called welfare reform and republican legislation that was passed. what we learned in american politics was americans fixate on the president and blame warm praise the president for what ever happens. congress gets very little credit or more to the point of a presidential candidate of the opposition congress that works well with a president gets very little credit for their good sportsmanship. what they do is to re-elect the incumbent president. one cannot blame mitch
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 8:00am EDT
? when the secretary comes to town. they had never met. great educators and business leaders and all in the same community and invested and not going anywhere. have to break those barriers. we can facilitate the local level of conversations happening as well. we need that. we need business and education to get a. .. how do know that, why did you do that. at some point they did it because they had always done it that way or they had some sort of rule that wasn't based on any research. and so i sort of went around campaigns some degree skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money, time and resources. as i learned about people starting in academia, these randomized control trials within being adopted by people in the political world. i learned more about the innovations of data and targeting based on, basically revolutionized campaigns in the last decade. this was a major shift, and in addition to all of these new forms of research changing the way campaigns operate is they have this kind of cultural tension between a lot of the old p
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 11:00pm EDT
s examples of that. if you stop and think, at one time education was considered more of a woman's issue in the legislature until in the 80's when we began connecting it to economic development. and once it became an economic development issue then it's no longer a woman's issue because she takes her children and now it's everybody's issue. >> one thing that younger people in the audience need to understand. for us, for our generation, women and also many many men, feminist was it positive for. it was a good thing, a very good thing and so you have got these women who embraced feminism who think it's a good thing and have now discovered that it's not working anymore. the women i teach don't want to identify with some of them. it's the last thing they want to be identified with and you asked them, do you believe in this and do you believe that in this and they say yes, yes, yes and i just go well the label is a problem. we have many women wanting -- not wanting to use the label and send signals that are so skewed with the label because they know there are group of voters out there w
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 6:00pm EDT
good education at smith. i was not--i--i'm not one of those people who thinks of my college years as a happy golden time. i mean, i was a texan who was up in massachusetts, so first of all i was cold. i mean, i couldn't bel--i was freezing to death the whole time i was up there. and i found yankees rather, in some ways, chilly and difficult compared to the texans i was used to. but i do think i got an awfully good education. c-span: what'd you study? >> guest: grateful for it. history. my--my major was history. c-span: and how long did you spend with the new york times as a reporter? >> guest: six years with the new york times. some of it in new york as a political reporter at city hall in albany and then later as bureau chief out in the rocky mountains. c-span: would you take a little time and tell us about reporting on the funeral of elvis presley? >> guest: oh, now there is something that when i've been standing in the checkout line at the grocery store and if i really need to impress people, i just let fall that i covered elvis' funeral. and, boy, people just practically draw back
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